Animal Ambassadors

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Jake

Corn Snake

Corn snakes are constrictors and are native to the south eastern and mid-atlantic United States.  They typically eat small rodents and amphibians.  Jake is our longest tenured ambassador, living with us for over 15 years.

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Axel

Axolotl

Native to Lake Xochimilco in Mexico City, axolotls are unusual amphibians as they remain adolescents their whole lives. Where salamanders typically metamorphoses and migrate from water to land, axolotls remain aquatic and gilled.  They can also transform adult cells back into stem cells and regenerate parts of their bodies including limbs and even brain tissue.  Isn't Axel cool!

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Spot

Diamondback Terrapin

Native to brackish coastal tidal marshes of the northeastern and southern United States (like our very own Chesapeake Bay region), diamondback terrapins are named for the beautiful diamond pattern on the top of its shell.  They are strong swimmers and have strong jaws for crushing shells of prey, including clams and snails.  Spot loves people and will often climb out of her pool to say hi.

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Bernate

North American Box Turtle

Bernate (short for Hibernate) is the star of our Kindergarten program.  He teaches kids how to follow their instincts and how animals survive winter.  He is native to North American and could live up to 50 years!  He eats lots of veggies and fruit.

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Kai

Kingsnake

Kingsnakes are native to North America and can vary widely in color and size. Some are brown and black while others are brightly marked with red, yellow, white and/ or gray.  They can also be have stripes, speckles, rings or saddle-shaped bands. They are constrictors and have been known to eat other snakes as well as lizards, rodents, birds and eggs.

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Ruby

Red-Eared Slider

Ruby is a type of pond turtle native to the southern United States and Mexico.  Because they are such a popular pet all over the world, they have become one of the most common invasive turtle species.  Ruby is almost entirely aquatic, but likes to sunbathe on her log when cold.  Sliders look practically identical regardless of sex, so we're not sure if Ruby is a boy or girl, but we love her either way!